Harmony Golf Preserve Intercollegiate

Howard HIckey working on his sand game

Howard HIckey working on his sand game

Harmony Golf Preserve Intercollegiate
Harmony Golf Preserve (Par 72, 7,208 yards)
March 4-6, 2013

 
We spent the past few days in warm, sunny… well, cold and sunny, and windy, Orlando, Florida earlier this week for VCU’s Harmony Golf Preserve Intercollegiate. So nice to get back to competitive golf! And for those of you who think competition is the same as recreational golf, wrong, wrong, and wrong. Somebody called me out saying that competition and normal golf is the same since you’re always trying to “shoot the low score”. Well, friend, if it were that simple, I would be shooting 68s every round. Sadly instead, the pressure that everyone deals with especially after a four month layoff from tournaments eventually leads to 79s (my first round score).

Okay, regardless, it was fun to play a tournament again and actually be constantly worried about making bogeys and hurting the team. That doesn’t sound fun, but holding yourself accountable for the success of the team, and then playing well, means a whole lot. To me at least.

Harmony Preserve was a fairly run of the mill Florida course: fairly wide open, lots of water, and windy. Also a Johnny Miller design, and his architecture parallels his broadcasting: boring and enjoyed by few. Harmony didn’t stand out to me in any way (which I suppose is opposite of his commentating). I won’t say it was a bad course, but there was no risk/reward, and it seemed like every hole was into the wind. I’ll also say I had a bone to pick because of the pins we played. Generally half of them each day were tucked behind bunkers and within three or four paces of the fringe. Attacking the pins and being aggressive went out of style very quickly this week. The equalizer however, was how smooth the greens rolled.

And speaking of greens, I putted really well this week. Not counting putts from the fringe, I had 24 putts in the second round. That’s 12 one-putts. My current theory for why I putted so well boils down to the fact that this was the first time in 2013 that I actually had the chance to putt on smooth, quick greens.

As for my play, I get to use an excuse. I’ve had bronchitis — or something along those lines — for the past two weeks and I’m still recovering. The first round was cold and I was coughing pretty violently, plus having to shake off the rust didn’t help, so I ended up with a 79. Decent relative to what I thought I was going to shoot after being +5 through six holes. I followed this up with consecutive 72s, good scores, but frustrating because I came so close to breaking par. After starting something like T26 at the end of the first round, I was excited to make come back and make the top 10, even if there were only 36 players (they were all solid teams! I promise!) We all have work to do however, because we came in 5th out of 6 as a team. And we in fact have a great opportunity to do that this week!

As I write, we’re on a plane to California (no east coast people, it’s not “Cali”), and we’re playing at multiple U.S. Open courses as well as competing in the University of San Francisco’s tournament this Monday and Tuesday. I think I’ll do some course reviews and tournament recaps, if it’s cool with you.

 
Harmony Preserve scoring
Recap

Courses on deck:

Pelican Hill Golf Course
Pauma Valley Country Club (USF Tournament)
Riviera Country Club
Olympic Club – Lake
Claremont Country Club
Olympic Club – Ocean

Oh and a live scoring link for the USF tournament of course!

2nd hole

2nd hole

Dinner. How did this happen.

Dinner. How did this happen.


The Curse of the Northeast

Sooo… I have an article I wrote for my News Writing class here that I’d like to share with you. I think it’s fun but it also might be a little aggressive in places and some might disagree with it. But read it anyway.

Trevor Sluman working hard on his game

Trevor Sluman working hard on his game

The Curse of the Northeast

Trevor Sluman, a sophomore from Pittsford, N.Y. — yes, he is related to 1988 PGA Championship winner Jeff Sluman — has not walked the average college player’s career path. He started at Towson University outside of Baltimore, but began shopping around for a new team after his fall semester, with the understanding that he had reached his peak in northeast golf.

“I liked Towson a lot,” he said. “But from a golfing standpoint, it wasn’t helping me at all.”

Sluman packed up at the end of his freshman year and headed to greener pastures: the University of Louisville. In his eyes, it offered him so many more opportunities and benefits, ones he could not pass up.

There are many disadvantages that separate a humble little Colonial Athletic Association school such as Towson and a main stage Big East Conference school such as Louisville, and transfers like Sluman prove that point: most northern-bound schools cannot compete on a regular basis with their counterparts to the south.

“The biggest disadvantage a northeast team has is the climate,” said Andres Pumariega, recent graduate of George Washington and current assistant coach for the George Washington team. “The kids that have aspirations of playing professionally or at a high [Division I] level want the ability to play and practice all year.”

Indeed, the weather seems to play a large part in determining the NCAA champion. The only northern team to claim the national title in the past 30 years is the University of Minnesota.

Not every student-athlete bases their four years on NCAA titles, however. For the northern teams who may not be competing in the postseason, playing college golf can still improve their games and allow for a great deal of tournament experience.

“Kids think that they have to go south or west to improve,” said former University of Pennsylvania coach Scott Allen. “I believe that you can get better at a school in the northeast. It comes down to practice facilities and coaching and schedule. A school in the north can have an edge in all of those categories and some kids still think they are better off going south.”

The biggest pull that the northeast teams have, for now, is academics. Many college player do not set out to become the next Tiger Woods or Yani Tseng; they are more interested in the former portion of their title of student-athlete. Going to an Ivy League institution looks good to any potential employer, though the competition on the course may not be the same caliber as a Pac-12 school.

These Ivy and Pac-12 schools, as well as every other university across the country, weigh the importance of athletics and academics differently, and student-athletes have to make sure they understand what that balance is before they arrive and how they will adjust.

“It is really hard, just because academics are so rough,” said Alexandra Wong, a freshman at Princeton University. “We take [golf] just as seriously, even though we might not practice as much.”

At a northeast school like Princeton it may be easy to determine, but at a state school across the country, the focus could be completely different.

Parker Ramsey, a sophomore at San Jose State University, resigned from the men’s golf team at SJSU earlier this year, with very little argument from his coach on the matter. Ramsey felt in both academics and athletics, his coach provided very little help when it was needed in his golf and his education.

“He paid a lot of attention to the top three [players], and he kind of let everyone else do their own thing, unless he gave you a full ride,” Ramsey said. “Everyone else was kind of on their own to do their own thing around him, but never stuck his neck out for those guys.”

This kind of behavior can create a rift in a team, and studying as well as playing can take a turn for the worse. Ramsey quit because he understood his “big picture, little picture”, and if golf was going to negatively affect his college experience, he had no reason to continue.

Stories like this happen on occasion sadly, for individual academic attention is not always possible at large state schools focused on athletic successes. For all the bottom-tier golf programs in the northeast, there exist very few universities that do not offer first-rate academic support. At George Washington University for example, most student-athletes are required to meet with advisors on a regular basis to go over grades, to schedule tutors, and to make sure everything academically is running smoothly.

While many northeastern schools are above average academically and below average in golf rankings, they do still have a chance to succeed on the course. Golf may seem to be an individual sport, but team dynamic plays a definitive role in the success or failure of a team. When it comes to college golf, coaches want players who are interested in creating a collective goal-oriented group, not kids who just want an individual trophy.

“I definitely think having a team that gets along really well, that are able to work together and have good chemistry, can play a lot better than a more talented team that doesn’t get along as well,” explained University of California, Berkeley women’s golf graduate assistant Emily Childs.

Northeast teams like George Washington, Mount St. Mary’s, and Penn went to the NCAA Regionals last year not because they are considered powerhouses in their respective leagues, but because they rode hot streaks into their conference championships, and won because of good play and team effort. (Conference champions receive an auto-bid into Regionals.)

If the postseason was determined solely by talent every year, these teams would never have a chance. But because of certain players who have caught fire, an occasional lucky break, and as Childs says, good chemistry, golf becomes anyone’s game at the end of April.

Like his fellow Division I golfers, Sluman is looking forward to the spring, the chance at a Big East conference title, and a run deep into the postseason, something Towson never could have offered him.

“Everyone pushes each other so much more,” Sluman said. “And you need that for a golf team, to have everybody push each other because if you have one guy that’s playing better than the others you want to get there too. And when the competition is so close, fighting for that last spot, it just makes you a better golfer.”

That is what Sluman is striving to become, a better golfer. His biggest goal is to make it on tour, something not achievable — for himself at least — while honing his game at Towson.

For many others, however, teams in the northeast offer exactly what they need. Whether it is a top-notch business degree, a tight-knit team, or just a school where a freshman can make the starting five, these universities are perfect — as long as your uncle doesn’t have any Wanamaker Trophies on his fireplace mantle.


ODU/OBX 2012

Kilmarlic #11

Old Dominion U / Outer Banks Invitational
Kilmarlic Golf Club (Par 72, 6,560 yards)
October 21-23, 2012

Woof. I didn’t think it would happen, but we came in last as a team at this tournament. Not sure what motivational mumbo jumbo I can pull out of our play other than the fact that we need to get our s**t together. This simply isn’t GW Golf.
Not that I can sit here and say I played well either, though. I made two resounding mistakes this week. First, I played with a number in my head. I consistently went through my first 36 holes with one goal, however unreachable it was, and I paid dearly for it. Instead of going way under par, I shot 76-77. Day three I decided to just take the round one shot at a time, which is how I should always play. Though I didn’t tear it up, I still ended up shooting one under 71, which is something to take into the tournament next week and to snowball my momentum.
My second mistake was in my putting. After putting lights out last week at Appalachian State, I lipped out a lot of putts in the first round here, and asked for an opinion on my putting the next morning. I ended up squaring my shoulders, and I lost all my confidence in my putting after doing so. I know I would have made more putts if I hadn’t messed with it simply because of I would have been in a better place mentally.
I think the learning curve from last year with four senior starters to this year with lots of underclassmen has been quite apparent. We cannot expect to go out and win tournaments yet, the consistency just isn’t there. I do believe we have some great new players, but we just haven’t put the pieces together. I also believe this tournament made me realize that golf is the ultimate team sport. Though we play individually, the success of the team lies in each and every player. No one player can put the team on their back, and if one or two people play bad, the entire team loses a lot of ground. When you have to compete against 17 other teams at the same time, every team member is held accountable for posting a solid number, or else we have no chance.
Here’s to a comeback at Kiawah; after all, we’ve certainly set ourselves up for one.

Results

 

LIVE SCORING LINK TO KIAWAH ISLAND INTERCOLLEGIATE

Ocean sunrises are quite novel for us West Coasters

We’re on a boat


Donald Ross Intercollegiate Final Day

Mimosa Hills 2nd

Donald Ross Intercollegiate
Mimosa Hills Golf Club (Par 70, 6718 yards)
October 15-16, 2012

Okay. Done with midterms, now I can focus on golf for the final two weeks of our fall season. First, I wanna go through App State a bit.
First round, I had school record (65) in my head the whole time. Not the smartest idea, but I knew I was hitting the ball well, I knew I was putting well, and I knew I needed to turn it up for my team. I turned at two under, which left me only three birdies from the record since it was a par 70. I birdie the first then don’t find another until the seventh, where I just missed a long eagle putt from off the green. At this point I’m sweating a little because I need just one more to post 65. I chunk-snap-hooked my drive on eight, one of my achilles’ heels when I get nervous, but managed to hit a good second and make a solid up and down for par, leaving the three par ninth. I hooked the tee shot a little too far because of my nerves, and put it shortside in the bunker. Can’t get the up and down to go, 67. Still a solid score, tied for the lead after round one.
And for some reason, in the eight minutes between rounds, everything unraveled. I stopped hitting it so well, I didn’t make as many putts, and though it got a lot windier, my bad second round score was just because of me. 75 strokes made up my second round, and the day was just as tough for our team. We placed 11th out of 17 after the first day, and it wasn’t going to get any better the next day.
Before I get to that, however, I want to talk about a kid I played with, since I love making an example of people who don’t know how to act on the golf course. Granted, I’m not a saint when it comes to reacting to bad shots, but I certainly don’t give up, and I definitely don’t throw my clubs at golf carts. I don’t need to name names, but if this guy reads this, GET YOUR ACT TOGETHER. I don’t care how amazing you are, playing at High Point or what have you, but it’s annoying, it’s childish, and you’re not impressing anyone.
Now I’ve got that out of my system…
The final day didn’t suit our fancy, either. We kept dropping shots throughout the final 18, and ended up 13th out of 17. I get it, this is a transitional period for our team after losing four members of our starting lineup, but man, we have to turn it around real soon. That goes for myself especially. If we’re gonna turn it around, I have to put up numbers. I have to GET BUCKETS.
ODU/OBX Invite starts tomorrow. Plan: go lower than I did last year. Easy right?

Follow us here.


Donald Ross Intercollegiate Day One

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2nd hole

Donald Ross Intercollegiate
Mimosa Hills Golf Club (Par 70, 6718 yards)
October 15-16, 2012

Day one here in Morganton is ALMOST done. There was a thunderstorm this morning which prompted a one hour delay, and with tee times, we were screwed from the start. Even with the first tee times in the morning, our team only had two players finish 36 holes.
I shot a 67 this morning to leave me tied for the lead and and I’m 5 over this afternoon through 17 holes. We shot 291 as a team this morning and then blew up in the afternoon. I would do a longer recap but I have two midterms on Wednesday to study for, so we’ll have to compromise with a short update instead. Okay. Even though I gave up my first round lead I think I still have a chance to win! I’ll let you know! And follow us on Golfstat tomorrow!

THIS IS THE LINK


Olympic Club Junior Team

KD, James, Russ

Gosh darn this post is quite far after the fact, but I feel like I owe it to my teammates to write a little piece on what we did. When I say teammates, I don’t mean GW teammates however, I’m talking about the Olympic Club Junior Team.
We play in the Bay Cities League, which runs from June until August and consists of about 30 private clubs around the Bay Area who each form a team of players 21 and under. Most of the clubs who make it to the 8-team playoffs do so by offering college players free memberships for the summer and in return ask them to play on the team (our team has no such program in place, all of our players have been full members for many years). I think we generally play with a chip on our shoulders when it comes to this idea, because we’re all home grown.
We went undefeated in six regular season contests, notably beating our rivals Lake Merced and Stanford at their courses. This gave us the two seed in the playoffs, having lost the tie for the top spot with Saratoga CC because they won more points than us in their matches. It seemed irrelevant though, because we knew the next time we would play them if we kept winning would be the Championship Match, which is played as a 36 hole event, one round on each team’s course. Before I get into the playoff matches though, I’d like to introduce each of my awesome teammates (in order of the line-up)

Will Brueckner
This kid’s got game (and some really big ears). He’s only 15 and kicking my ass all over the golf course. Even so, it’s such a pleasure playing with him each week, especially when we post best ball scores like 61 and 63…
Parker Ramsey
Another sweetheart, who plays for San Jose State. He’s a little crazy, but hey who isn’t? Oh and his swing is pure.
Daniel Connolly
Another young-un with too much talent. Trust me, it’s rough to get a beat down from someone six inches shorter and five years younger than you. Also, if Parker’s swing is pure, then Daniel’s is PURE.
Stephanie Hsieh
Doubles as superstar at Brown University. Laughs a little too loud, but her birdies make up for it.
Matt Baumann
One of the “Big Three”, he considers himself most like James Harden, but with the yips. As the oldest guy on the team, I don’t know a person who didn’t look up to him.
Max Plank
Also known as Woody, he keeps putting up lower and lower numbers as the months go by. I’m always patiently waiting to get a text that says “Committed to Stanford!”
Trevor Murphy
Another one of the “Big Three”, most likely Russell Westbrook. One of the most ridiculous people I’ve ever met (see: club throwing, packing bacon in his golf bag for when he buys hamburgers), but also one of my favorite people.
Greg Mroz
I don’t even know what to say about him that hasn’t already been said. Sure knows how to laugh at himself though.
Cian Mahoney
A sleeper pick all year for Most Valuable Player. He’s not even in high school yet he holds his own with all of us.

So now that I’ve been sappy about all these kids I grew up with, I can get back to the playoffs.

Oh wait I have to say something about Willie too! Willie Toney is the Assistant Head Golf Professional at Olympic, and our adviser on all things life and golf related. So shout out to him, the King of Trash Talk. This is him. He’s a little blurry.

We played San Jose CC in the first round with a distinct home field advantage. I ended up being one of only two people who lost some points in the match, the final score being 32.5 Olympic – 3.5 San Jose. Wait, let’s backtrack a bit to why I lost those points. It was a funny story, actually.
The matches we play are in match play format, and I was one down going into the ninth hole, so I needed to win the hole to halve the first nine. I hit my shot on the green in regulation and reached for my putter when I got to the green, but found it wasn’t there. I then realized that after I hit my difficult sand shot to tap in range, I picked up my ball because my opponent conceded the par putt. Beaming with confidence, I stormed off to the next tee to prepare, but forgot I had brought my putter to the bunker. Flash forward to the ninth green, I had to putt with a wedge, taking three tries to finish the hole for a bogey and a tie, meaning I lost the front. At the end of the match, I also realized I had lost one down overall, so my stupid mistake cost me my entire match. Thank goodness I have solid teammates.
Our semifinal match against Santa Rosa, played at our course, was a breeze, no offense to our competitors. We won 27-9, and quickly set our sights on taking down Saratoga.
We had a bone and a half to pick with them after we lost to them in the first round of the playoffs last year. That match was held at Saratoga, a tricked-up, mini sized course. It is actually only nine holes, but we play twice to make up an 18 hole match. Local knowledge is everything there, and since only three of us had played a practice round, we had no chance of moving on. We knew what we were dealing with in the final this year, however, so a win was much more probable than just possible.
We took the first half of the match, played at our course, 22-14, led by a great round from Will. Only 14.5 points were needed to lock up the trophy at the end of day two, but no lead is big enough when traveling to Saratoga.
As much as I wish things could have been friendlier and easy-going for the Championship, it was apparent early on that the opposing team had no interest in such an idea. After numerous thrown/slammed clubs and words screamed that will not be shown on this blog, their poor sportsmanship came to a head on the sixth hole. I was watching one of my competitors in my group tee off, and he hit an awful snap hook. Instead of handling it well, he let the club fly out of his hands in disgust, and it hit me directly in the face from 10 feet away. Luckily I was no worse for the wear, but needless to say I didn’t appreciate the action. Though it was accidental, I have never seen worse behavior in a competition. It was shameful and a disgrace to everyone involved. Hitting a player with a club should have necessitated this player’s expulsion from his team and club.
The rest of the match for me went poorly; I put up zero points in the match. As disappointing as it was to hurt the team, I knew they could clinch without me. Little did I know it would be so close. The championship ended up coming down to the last match of Stephanie and Cian, with Cian playing his first match in the playoffs. He rose to the occasion and took all the points in his match. Stephanie did as well, securing the victory with a final score of 39-34.
I couldn’t be prouder of all of these people. We put in an awesome effort all year and vindicated our loss to Saratoga last year. We definitely felt like the Thunder beating the Heat in the NBA Finals (sadly it didn’t actually happen that way…).
If you actually read all the way to here, you must be pretty bored, so thanks for sticking around. Have a billion more papers/articles to write now that I’m done with this. Okay, that’s all. Muffins.

Bay Cities League


Hartford Hawks Invitational

Sure is purty up here

Hartford Hawks Invitational
Bull’s Bridge GC (Par 72, 6,992 yards)
September 24-25, 2012

Wooh boy, am I playing bad or what! I keep getting really close to snapping my putter, only stopping myself with memories of all the times I’ve actually been able to put the ball into the hole. I averaged between four and five lipouts per round, might have been more because I’ve suppressed them deep in my subconscious.
I can’t figure out how much luck is involved in my putting right now. I’ve started actually making putts for the first time in a long time, but at the same time, there are a lot of putts that should be going in that don’t. Which is exactly why golf is so frustrating to me right now. I feel like it’s out of my control.
Throughout the tournament I felt like I was on the cusp of playing really well, and I was around par a lot of the time. Instead of shooting good scores however, I found a way to mess it up and post a number bigger than what I really should have shot. I posted rounds of 76-78-78, which is much worse than I wanted to do, but realistically much better than how I played here last year.
The only player of note that actually played well for us was Carlos in his first college tournament. He shot one under in the second round and really helped out the team as the rest of us couldn’t keep it together. We finished 8th out of 16 teams, which translates to “we have a hell of a lot of work to do.” Appalachian State’s tournament in Nowhere, N.C. is next up in a couple of weeks, so there’s plenty of time for adjustments.
Also, the best part of this trip was the new Twitter account we put together: “Questions by Carlos”. These are all real quotes by one of our newest players. Hopefully he doesn’t get too angry at me and asks me to take it down. Because that would be such a fun-ruiner. Please Carlos, don’t ruin the fun. Also, not at the table Carlos! [that’s a quote from the Hangover. It’s a funny movie. You should see it.]

Recap

Results

Favorite place ever

 


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